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Triad is a Federal/State Interagency Partnership


Training Classes and Materials

Information on Triad training classes and associated presentation materials are available via this section.


Upcoming Internet Seminars

  • Affordable and Workforce Housing Development on Former Brownfield SitesU.S. EPA Office of Brownfields and Land Revitalization
    February 26, 2024, 1:00PM-2:30PM EST, 18:00-19:30 GMT
    This webinar will provide an overview of the environmental considerations in redeveloping Brownfield sites for housing, explore the role public-private-partnerships can play in facilitating housing and Brownfield development, and review some of the major funding resources available to support the development of workforce and affordable housing.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • FRTR Presents...Recent Advances in PFAS Characterization TechnologiesFederal Remediation Technologies Roundtable (FRTR)
    February 28, 2024, 1:00PM-3:00PM EST, 18:00-20:00 GMT
    This webinar will include live deliveries of two presentations from the recent FRTR Fall meeting, with updated information:
    "Best Practices for PFAS Sampling and Evaluation"
    "Clean Water Act Methods: Overview of EPA's CWA PFAS Method Activities".

    The science and technology of site characterization for per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) has advanced in the five years since FRTR last addressed the topic in 2018. Federal agency budgets for PFAS remediation have grown substantially during this time. As a result, site characterization efforts such as Remedial Investigations, as well as early response actions, are underway at many Federal facilities. Funding for field-scale projects to further advance PFAS characterization technology and methodologies also has increased substantially.

    This webinar will allow PFAS member agencies to share results of recent and on-going PFAS projects that are improving our understanding of PFAS characterization technologies.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • In Vitro Bioaccessibility Assay (IVBA) Sampling Guidance Update - Part 2 Applying RBA Data to Human Health Risk AssessmentU.S. EPA Bioavailability Technical Review Workgroup (BAC)
    March 1, 2024, 1:00PM-2:30PM EST, 18:00-19:30 GMT
    The Technical Review Workgroup (TRW) Bioavailability Committee recently published the "Guidance for Sample Collection for In Vitro Bioaccessibility Assay for Arsenic and Lead in Soil and Applications of Relative Bioavailability Data in Human Health Risk Assessment." This is an update to the 2015 Guidance for Sample Collection for In Vitro Bioaccessibility Assay for Lead (Pb) in Soil. The update is intended to help EPA risk assessors, remedial project managers, and on-scene coordinators develop and use bioavailability data at their sites. It incorporates sample planning and data analysis recommendations from EPA's Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process that are pertinent to sampling for In Vitro Bioaccessibility (IVBA) and Relative Bioavailability (RBA). It also clarifies the application of IVBA and RBA data to human health risk assessment, the development of risk-based goals at CERCLA remedial and removal sites and includes arsenic (As) which was recently added to the In Vitro Bioaccessibility Assay.

    The TRW has developed a series of trainings based on the updated guidance. This session will focus on a discussion of systemic planning, data quality objectives and approaches to apply relative bioavailability data to adjust risk based action levels or exposure point concentrations at soil arsenic and lead contaminated sites.  This training will target a general audience of regional staff working in risk assessment, remediation, emergency response, technical support, and quality assurance. The training will be an approximately one hour long and will include time for general discussion. Members of the Bioavailability Committee and a Regional representative will be present to answer questions in real time.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • In Vitro Bioaccessibility Assay (IVBA) Sampling Guidance Update - Part 3 Sample Planning to Meet Site Assessment Decision Confidence ObjectivesU.S. EPA Bioavailability Technical Review Workgroup (BAC)
    March 18, 2024, 1:00PM-3:00PM EDT, 17:00-19:00 GMT
    The Technical Review Workgroup (TRW) Bioavailability Committee recently published the "Guidance for Sample Collection for In Vitro Bioaccessibility Assay for Arsenic and Lead in Soil and Applications of Relative Bioavailability Data in Human Health Risk Assessment." This is an update to the 2015 Guidance for Sample Collection for In Vitro Bioaccessibility Assay for Lead (Pb) in Soil. The update is intended to help EPA risk assessors, remedial project managers, and on-scene coordinators develop and use bioavailability data at their sites. It incorporates sample planning and data analysis recommendations from EPA's Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process that are pertinent to sampling for In Vitro Bioaccessibility (IVBA) and Relative Bioavailability (RBA). It also clarifies the application of IVBA and RBA data to human health risk assessment, the development of risk-based goals at CERCLA remedial and removal sites and includes arsenic (As) which was recently added to the In Vitro Bioaccessibility Assay.

    The TRW has developed a series of trainings based on the updated guidance. This session will focus on a discussion of soil sample planning and data evaluation to assess confidence in site assessment and remediation decisions at soil arsenic & lead contaminated sites. EPAs new bioavailability sampling guidance tool will also be presented.  This training will target a general audience of regional staff working in risk assessment, remediation, emergency response, technical support, and quality assurance. The training will be an approximately one and half hours long and will include time for general discussion. Members of the Bioavailability Committee and a Regional representative will be present to answer questions in real time.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Federal Facilities Academy: Community Involvement at Federal FacilitiesU.S. EPA FFRRO
    March 21, 2024, 1:00PM-3:00PM EDT, 17:00-19:00 GMT
    Community Involvement at Federal Facilities is a two-hour webinar course that focuses on community involvement requirements, resources, and techniques available for Federal Facilities being cleaned up at National Priorities List (NPL) sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). By taking the course, participants will achieve the following objectives:
    • Learn about community involvement requirements under CERCLA;
    • Understand the roles of the lead federal agency and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in public involvement at Federal Facilities;
    • Discover resources and tools available for community involvement activities;
    • Explore community involvement techniques and approaches that can be used at Superfund sites; and,
    • Identify community involvement opportunities throughout the Superfund process at Federal Facilities.

    The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, case studies, and group discussions. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of the CERCLA process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).


    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • In Vitro Bioaccessibility Assay (IVBA) Sampling Guidance Update - Part 4 Soil Sampling Best Practices and Laboratory Methods to Measure IVBA & RBA U.S. EPA Bioavailability Technical Review Workgroup (BAC)
    April 1, 2024, 1:00PM-2:30PM EDT, 17:00-18:30 GMT
    The Technical Review Workgroup (TRW) Bioavailability Committee recently published the "Guidance for Sample Collection for In Vitro Bioaccessibility Assay for Arsenic and Lead in Soil and Applications of Relative Bioavailability Data in Human Health Risk Assessment." This is an update to the 2015 Guidance for Sample Collection for In Vitro Bioaccessibility Assay for Lead (Pb) in Soil. The update is intended to help EPA risk assessors, remedial project managers, and on-scene coordinators develop and use bioavailability data at their sites. It incorporates sample planning and data analysis recommendations from EPA's Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process that are pertinent to sampling for In Vitro Bioaccessibility (IVBA) and Relative Bioavailability (RBA). It also clarifies the application of IVBA and RBA data to human health risk assessment, the development of risk-based goals at CERCLA remedial and removal sites and includes arsenic (As) which was recently added to the In Vitro Bioaccessibility Assay.

    The TRW has developed a series of trainings based on the updated guidance. This session will focus on a discussion of soil sample collection and processing best practices and methods to directly measure relative bioavailability (RBA) or estimate RBA by measuring in vitro bioaccessibility via EPA Method 1340 at soil arsenic and lead contaminated sites.  This training will target a general audience of regional staff working in risk assessment, remediation, emergency response, technical support, and quality assurance. The training will be an approximately one hour long and will include time for general discussion. Members of the Bioavailability Committee and a Regional representative will be present to answer questions in real time.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Federal Facilities Online Academy: Military Munitions Policy OverviewU.S. EPA FFRRO
    April 15, 2024, 1:00PM-3:00PM EDT, 17:00-19:00 GMT
    Military Munitions Policy Webinar is a two-hour webinar course that provides an overview of the Department of Defense (DoD) Military Munitions Response Program (MMRP), munitions policies, and how the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) is applied to munitions sites. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:
    • Learn about DoD MMRP;
    • Understand the CERCLA process as applied to a munitions site;
    • Understand munitions policies; and,
    • Explore EPA Munitions Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, case studies, and quizzes. The target audience for this course are federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of munitions and the CERCLA process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).


    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • U.S. EPA Superfund Remedial Program's Approach for Addressing Radioactive ContaminationU.S. EPA OLEM OSRTI ARD Science Policy Branch
    April 17, 2024, 1:30PM-3:30PM EDT, 17:30-19:30 GMT
    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund program has developed regulations and guidance for remediating radioactively contaminated CERCLA sites. The focus of this presentation is an overview of EPA's recommended guidance documents on ARARs and risk assessment, models for conducting risk and dose assessments, and community involvement tools for engaging in meaningful involvement with the public that are intended to be used during the process to determine cleanup levels for radioactively contaminated Superfund sites. The presentation is intended to help the audience obtain knowledge of EPA's recommended guidance to facilitate cleanups that are consistent with how chemical contaminants are addressed, except where technical differences posed by radiation are addressed. The guidance and tools that are discussed in the presentation are freely available on the internet. This webinar provides an updated version of Module 3 that was presented in the ITRC webinar "Radiation Site Cleanup: CERCLA Requirements and Guidance" on June 5, 2007.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Federal Facilities Online Academy: Determining Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) in RODsU.S. EPA FFRRO
    May 14, 2024, 1:00PM-3:00PM EDT, 17:00-19:00 GMT
    Determining ARARs at Federal Facility Sites is a two-hour webinar course that will highlight how to determine Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) in decision-documents based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance, identify commonly used ARARs, and when to involve partners. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:
    • Understand the general procedures for ARAR identification, analysis, and documentation;
    • Learn about ARARs under Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Section 121(d) and associated EPA guidance;
    • Identify the three types of ARARs and how they are determined; and,
    • Explore CERCLA ARAR waiver criteria and the six waivers identified under CERCLA 121(d).

    The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture and quizzes. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of ARARs and the CERCLA process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).


    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • U.S. EPA Superfund Remedial Program's Approach for Risk Harmonization when addressing Chemical and Radioactive Contamination at SitesU.S. EPA OLEM OSRTI ARD Science Policy Branch
    May 22, 2024, 1:30PM-3:30PM EDT, 17:30-19:30 GMT
    To help meet the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund program's mandate to protect human health and the environment from current and potential threats posed by uncontrolled hazardous substance (both radiological and non-radiological), pollutant, or contaminant releases, the Superfund program has developed a human health evaluation process as part of its remedial response program. The process of gathering and assessing human health risk information is adapted from well-established chemical risk assessment principles and procedures. Within the Superfund remediation framework, radioactive contamination is dealt with in a consistent manner as with chemical contamination, except to account for the technical differences between radionuclides and chemicals. This consistency is important since at every radioactively contaminated site being addressed under Superfund's primary program for long-term cleanup, the National Priorities List (NPL), chemical contamination is also present.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Federal Facilities Online Academy: Resolving Issues before Formal DisputeU.S. EPA FFRRO
    June 12, 2024, 1:00PM-3:00PM EDT, 17:00-19:00 GMT
    Resolving Issues Before Formal Dispute is a two-hour webinar course that identifies less formal options to address conflict before going to dispute under a federal facility agreement. This webinar provides project management tips and techniques to address disagreements early in the process . By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:
    • Identify factors that contribute to conflict when working with team members from different agencies;
    • Learn how to prepare a team to handle conflict;
    • Explore tips and techniques to improve communication and come to resolution; and,
    • Understand when formal dispute should be considered.

    The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, group discussions, case studies, and quizzes. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).


    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Federal Facilities Online Academy: Federal Facility Five-Year ReviewU.S. EPA FFRRO
    July 11, 2024, 1:00PM-3:00PM EDT, 17:00-19:00 GMT
    Federal Facility Five-Year Review Webinar is a two-hour webinar course that provides an overview of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) five-year reviews. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:
    • Understand Five-Year Review purpose and regulatory context
    • Learn how to prepare and conduct a five-year review
    • Identify the information and data needed to support a protectiveness statement
    • Address emerging contaminants and options available to ensure that the federal agencies address these contaminants
    • Identify the different scenarios when EPA makes an independent finding of the protectiveness of the remedy
    • Learn about similarities and differences between federal and private site five-year reviews

    The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, case studies, and quizzes. There will also be an opportunity for participants to ask questions. The target audience for this course are federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding the CERCLA process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).


    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Federal Facilities Online Academy: Role of Superfund Performance MeasuresU.S. EPA FFRRO
    August 8, 2024, 1:00PM-3:00PM EDT, 17:00-19:00 GMT
    Role of Superfund Performance Measures is a two-hour webinar course that will identify the role of performance measures, including environmental indicators, how to justify their status, and how to achieve an under-control status at Superfund sites. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:
    • Discover the origin and role of Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) Measures;
    • Explore the different types of internal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) planning targets reported through the Superfund Enterprise Management System (SEMs) database; and,
    • Learn about Environmental Indicators for Human Exposure and Groundwater Migration and how they are determined.

    The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, group discussion, and quizzes. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).


    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Federal Facilities Online Academy: Record of Decision (RODs) and More at Federal FacilitiesU.S. EPA FFRRO
    September 12, 2024, 1:00PM-3:00PM EDT, 17:00-19:00 GMT
    RODs [Records of Decision] and More at Federal Facilities is a two-hour webinar course that will provide an overview of how early and interim actions, adaptive management, RODs, Explanations of Significant Differences (ESDs), and ROD Amendments are used at Federal Facilities. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:
    • Understand how removal actions, sampling and analysis plans, and decision documents are used at Federal Facilities;
    • Learn about the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Department of Energy (DoE) Joint Policy Memo;
    • Identify how Interim Actions can be used as part of an overall cleanup strategy; and,
    • Learn the process for changing remedies after a ROD is issued.

    The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, group discussions, case studies, and quizzes. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).


    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Federal Facilities Online Academy: RCRA/CERCLA IntegrationU.S. EPA FFRRO
    October 24, 2024, 1:00PM-3:00PM EDT, 17:00-19:00 GMT
    RCRA and CERCLA Integration at Federal Facilities is a two-hour webinar course that will provide an overview of how the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) can be integrated at Federal Facilities through use of Federal Facility Agreements, regulator coordination, and lead regulator approach. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:
    • Learn about Federal Facility Agreements and how they identify RCRA and CERCLA roles and responsibilities;
    • Explore relevant memos and policies addressing RCRA and CERCLA coordination; and,
    • Become familiar with some RCRA policies that apply to CERCLA wastes.

    The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, case studies, and quizzes. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of RCRA and CERCLA. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).


    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Federal Facilities Online Academy: Groundwater Policy OverviewU.S. EPA FFRRO
    November 13, 2024, 1:00PM-3:00PM EST, 18:00-20:00 GMT
    Groundwater Policy and Federal Facilities Overview is a two-hour webinar course that provides an overview of U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater policies and guidance with emphasis on cleanups at federal facilities. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:
    • Identify EPA groundwater policies;
    • Understand groundwater classification and beneficial use in restoration objectives;
    • Understand nature and extent considerations from groundwater contaminant plumes;
    • Explore applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) commonly associated with groundwater remedies;
    • Identify groundwater considerations for monitored natural attenuation (MNA), institutional controls, and technical impracticability waivers; and,
    • Discover information on major groundwater policies from other federal agencies, such as Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DoE).

    The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture and quizzes. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).


    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Federal Facilities Online Academy: Coordinating with Tribes at Federal FacilitiesU.S. EPA FFRRO
    December 12, 2024, 1:00PM-3:00PM EST, 18:00-20:00 GMT
    Coordinating with Tribes at Federal Facilities is a two-hour webinar course that will provide an overview of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) policy on consultation and coordination with Indian Tribes at federal facilities. This webinar will also provide tips on how to work more collaboratively during this process. By taking this course, participants will achieve the following objectives:
    • Identify EPA processes and policies for interacting with the Tribes;
    • Understand the roles of EPA and tribal governments in Federal Facility clean ups;
    • Learn about the Federal Facilities Restoration and Reuse Office (FFRRO); and,
    • Discover EPA resources and tools available to assist Federal Facilities in building partnerships with the Tribes;

    The instructional methodology for this course includes lecture, group discussions, and case studies. The target audience for this course is federal, state, and tribal representatives who work on Federal Facility cleanups. Ideally, students should have a basic understanding of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process. This course is part of the Federal Facilities Academy training program. Please consider registering for other Federal Facility Academy courses and obtain a certificate upon completion of the entire Federal Facility Academy series (12 courses total).


    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • MicroplasticsInterstate Technology and Regulatory Council
    February 27, 2024, 1:00PM-3:15PM EST, 18:00-20:15 GMT
    In response to one of the biggest emerging environmental concerns, ITRC formed the Microplastics Team in 2021 to develop the Microplastics Guidance Document. Plastics have become pervasive in modern life and are now used in a wide range of commercial and industrial applications. Microplastics may result from the degradation and fragmentation of larger plastics, or they may be intentionally produced for specific applications and products. Regardless of their origin, microplastics are now ubiquitous in our environment. Because of their small size and pervasiveness in the environment, microplastics, along with any other contaminants which are adhered to the microplastics, may be inadvertently consumed by humans and other organisms.

    The online ITRC Guidance Document (available in February 2023) is geared toward an audience with reasonable level of scientific understanding, but not microplastic-specific knowledge. The guidance provides a user with information on microplastics and the state of the applied science without having to go to the scientific literature.

    The target audience for the guidance and this training course includes state regulators and environmental consultants, as well as community and tribal stakeholders.

    The guidance and this associated training course uses a conceptual site model to navigate microplastics in the environment and explore the following general areas:
    • An introduction to microplastics, their sources, and worldwide distribution
    • The pathways through which microplastics can enter and travel in the environment and their distribution in various media (water, soil, sediment, air, and biota)
    • A current look at the most common techniques and best practices for sampling and analyzing microplastics
    • Potential human health and ecological risks associated with microplastics in the environment
    • An overview of existing regulations related to microplastics and macroplastics at the state, federal, and international levels
    • Examples of prevention and mitigation strategies and best management practices to reduce microplastics from entering the environment and the emerging technologies to abate, treat, and remediate microplastics once they exist in the environment
    • Identification of data gaps and the need for further research
    • Several case studies illustrating a range of current microplastics-related topics
    Prior to attending the training class, participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC Microplastics Guidance document.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • ITRC PFAS Introductory TrainingInterstate Technology and Regulatory Council
    February 29, 2024, 1:00PM-3:00PM EST, 18:00-20:00 GMT
    Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a large and complex class of anthropogenic compounds whose prevalence in the environment are an emerging, worldwide priority in environmental and human health. The ITRC PFAS Team, formed in 2017, has prepared readily accessible materials to present PFAS information to stakeholders, regulators, and policy makers. The PFAS team represents a diverse cross-section of expertise and experience working on PFAS.

    This training will include emerging science on PFAS, including topics such as Properties of PFAS, Fate and Transport, Sampling and Analysis, and Treatment Technologies. The technical presentations will be focused on those who are relatively new to PFAS. The training will last approximately 90 minutes and include time for questions.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • 1,4-Dioxane: Science, Characterization & Analysis, and RemediationInterstate Technology and Regulatory Council
    March 5, 2024, 1:00PM-3:15PM EST, 18:00-20:15 GMT
    In 2020, ITRC's 1,4-Dioxane team created multiple tools and documents that provide information to assist all interested stakeholders in understanding this contaminant and for making informed, educated decisions. Since the 1950s, 1,4-Dioxane has seen widespread use as a solvent stabilizer. The use of solvents through the 1980s suggests its presence at thousands of solvent sites in the US; however, it is not always a standard compound in typical analytical suites for hazardous waste sites, so it previously was overlooked. The U.S. EPA has classified 1,4-Dioxane as "likely to be carcinogenic to humans." Some states have devised health standards or regulatory guidelines for drinking water and groundwater standards; these are often sub-part per billion values. These low standards present challenges for analysis, characterization, and remediation of 1,4-Dioxane.

    The 1,4-Dioxane: Science, Characterization & Analysis, and Remediation training is a series of six (6) modules. The six individual modules will be presented together live, and then archived on the ITRC 1,4-Dioxane training webpage for on demand listening.

    The modular 1,4-Dioxane training series provides an overview of 1,4-Dioxane and presenting six sections from the ITRC guidance document (1,4d-1, 2021):
    • History of Use and Potential Sources (Sect 1)
    • Regulatory Framework (Sect 2)
    • Fate and Transport (Sect 3)
    • Sampling and Analysis (Sect 4)
    • Toxicity and Risk Assessment (Sect 5)
    • Remediation and Treatment Technologies (Sect 6)

    After the six-part 1,4-Dioxane: Science, Characterization & Analysis, and Remediation series, you should understand:
    • The history of 1,4-Dioxane manufacturing and usage and the potential sources of releases of 1,4-Dioxane to the environment.
    • Primary state and U.S. federal regulatory programs of relevance to 1,4-Dioxane
    • Key physical/chemical properties, and fate and transport processes that are relevant for 1,4-Dioxane
    • Benefits and limitations of the available analytical methods
    • Risk drivers for human health and how ecological risk compares
    • How/when/why different treatment technologies are appropriate

    We encourage you to use the ITRC 1,4-Dioxane products (14d-1) and these training modules to learn about 1,4-Dioxane and how you can apply these best practices to improve decision-making at your sites.
    For regulators and other government agency staff, this understanding of 1,4-Dioxane can be incorporated into your own programs. This training summarizes the current understanding of 1,4-Dioxane. While the training makes every effort to keep the information accessible to a wide audience, it is assumed that the participants will have some basic technical understanding of chemistry, environmental sciences, and risk assessment. As with other emerging contaminants, our understanding of 1,4-Dioxane continues to advance. This training provides the participants with information on areas where the science is evolving and where uncertainty persists.

    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Vapor Intrusion Mitigation (VIM-1) - A Two Part Series: Session 1Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council
    March 14, 2024, 1:00PM-3:00PM EDT, 17:00-19:00 GMT
    ITRC's Vapor Intrusion Mitigation training is a series of eight (8) modules, presented over two sessions.

    The Vapor Intrusion Mitigation training series provides an overview of vapor intrusion mitigation and presenting information from the ITRC fact sheets, technology information sheets, and checklists (VIM-1, 2021):

    Session 1:
    • Introduction & Overview of Vapor Intrusion Mitigation Training Team
    • Conceptual Site Models for Vapor Intrusion Mitigation
    • Public Outreach During Vapor Intrusion Mitigation
    • Rapid Response & Ventilation for Vapor Intrusion Mitigation
    • Remediation & Institutional Controls

Session 2:
  • Active Mitigation Approaches
  • Passive Mitigation Approaches
  • System Verification, OM&M, and Exit Strategies


When certain contaminants or hazardous substances are released into the soil or groundwater, they may volatilize into soil gas. Vapor intrusion (VI) occurs when these vapors migrate up into overlying buildings and contaminate indoor air. ITRC has previously released guidance documents focused on VI, including the "Vapor Intrusion Pathway: A Practical Guidance" (VI-1, 2007) and "Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management" (PVI, 2014). However, ITRC has received multiple requests for additional details and training on mitigation strategies for addressing this exposure pathway.

The ITRC Vapor Intrusion Mitigation Team (VIMT) created ten fact sheets, 16 technology information sheets, and 4 checklists with the goal of assisting regulators during review of vapor intrusion mitigation systems, and helping contractors understand the essential elements of planning, design, implementation, and operation, maintenance and monitoring (OM&M) of mitigation systems.

After the Vapor Intrusion Mitigation series, you should understand:
  • How to locate and utilize the VIM-1 fact sheets, technology information sheets, and checklists
  • The importance of a VI mitigation conceptual site model
  • How public outreach for VI mitigation differs from other environmental matters
  • When to implement rapid response for vapor intrusion and applicable methodologies
  • The differences between remediation, mitigation, and institutional controls
  • Available technologies for active and passive mitigation, and design considerations for various approaches
  • How/when/why different mitigation technologies are appropriate
  • How to verify mitigation system success, address underperformance, and develop a plan for discontinuing a mitigation system

We encourage you to use the ITRC Vapor Intrusion Mitigation work products (VIM-1) and these training modules to learn about vapor intrusion mitigation and how you can apply these best practices to improve decision-making at your sites. For regulators and other government agency staff, this understanding of vapor intrusion mitigation can be incorporated into your own programs.

While the training makes every effort to keep the information accessible to a wide audience, it is assumed that the participants will have some basic technical understanding of chemistry, environmental sciences, and risk assessment. As with other emerging contaminants, our understanding of vapor intrusion mitigation continues to advance. This training provides the participants with information on areas where the science is evolving and where uncertainty persists.

Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Environmental Data Management (EDM): Best Practices for Achieving and Maintaining Quality within Environmental Data ManagementInterstate Technology and Regulatory Council
    March 19, 2024, 1:00PM-2:30PM EDT, 17:00-18:30 GMT
    The ITRC Environmental Data Management Best Practices Team (EDMBP Team) prepared a series of guidance documents and case studies on best practices for all phases of EDM to address the need for guidance on managing large stores of environmental data. Environmental data management (EDM) is a broad field that encompasses all aspects of environmental research and regulation, from habitat studies and wildlife management plans to health advisories and remediation of hazardous waste sites.

    The EDMBP Team developed three Roundtable training sessions to support the Guidance Document and case studies. You are welcome to register for any of the three, but they do not build upon each other.Nobody wants to make the wrong decision, especially when it comes to the health of individuals and the planet we all inhabit. In order to make sound environmental decisions, you need confidence in the data being used to make those decisions. Collecting usable data is everyone's goal. Good planning, setting clear data quality objectives, and having procedures for measuring and documenting if those quality objectives were met, are the basic components in any data quality program. This Roundtable training is meant to lead project managers, data collectors, data managers, and data reviewers in a discussion about various aspects of environmental data quality. Are you struggling with determining the quality of your data sets and understanding if they should be used to make decisions? Do you have a hard time advocating for budget related to data quality tasks or determining how much review is necessary? Our collection of panelists will touch on these topics and more, as well as answer attendee questions related to environmental data quality.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Sustainable Resilient Remediation (SRR)Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council
    March 26, 2024, 1:00PM-3:15PM EDT, 17:00-19:15 GMT

    Extreme weather events and wildfires are increasing and impacting hazardous waste sites. The primary goal of cleanups, which is protecting human health and the environment, is undermined. Confronted with these risks, environmental professionals should assess, and design remedies that are sustainable and resilient. Sustainable resilient remediation (SRR) is an optimized solution to cleaning up and reusing a hazardous waste site that limits negative environmental impacts, maximizes social and economic benefits, and creates resilience against increasing threats.

    The objective of the ITRC Sustainable Resilient Remediation (SRR-1) is to provide resources and tools for regulators, stakeholders, consultants, and responsible parties to help integrate sustainable and resilient practices into remediation projects. This guidance updates the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council's (ITRC) Technical and Regulatory Guidance: Green and Sustainable Remediation: A Practical Framework (ITRC 2011a) and includes a strong resilience component to address the increasing threat of extreme weather events and wildfires. Recommendations for careful and continuous consideration of the social and economic costs and benefits of a cleanup project are included.

    Training Objectives


    • Educate participants about available SRR resources and tools
    • Impart evolution from Green and Sustainable Remediation (GSR) to SRR
    • Provide guidance on practical application and implementation of SRR
    • Provide participants with information necessary to navigate the SRR guidance and tools

    Training Goals

    • Provide information and resources for the social and economic dimensions of sustainability, including state-of-the-art social and economic evaluation tools
    • Provide a framework illustrating how and why sustainability and resilience should be integrated throughout the remedial project life cycle
    • Offer checklists of key sustainable best management practices to address resilience based on specific vulnerabilities at a site, as well as resources for additional information
    • Present interactive maps with links to available state and federal resources to quickly find examples and best practices from your state or other states and federal agencies
    • Reference case studies illustrating the application of SRR considerations

    After the SRR Training, a user will have the tools necessary to understand what SRR is and how it can be used to achieve a sustainable and resilient remediation outcome. This can be accomplished by remediation practitioners applying the principles and practices to a contaminated site and by providing SRR resources to help regulators and stakeholders in the development and review of project documents or submittals.

    The intended users of this guidance and training course are those individuals responsible for managing contaminated sites. Users of this training and the associated documents will develop an understanding of SRR and its importance in achieving sustainability and resilience for site remediation. Principals, best practices, resources, and trainer insights will help users conduct SRR tailored to the needs of the sites under their care.

    Recommended Reading: Participants are strongly encouraged to review the ITRC Sustainable Resilient Remediation, (SRR-1) document prior to participating in the training class. Also, because SRR-1 is an expansion and update of the concepts developed in Green and Sustainable Remediation: A Practical Framework, GSR-2, review of this document is recommended but is not a prerequisite.


    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Vapor Intrusion Mitigation (VIM-1) - A Two Part Series: Session 2Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council
    March 28, 2024, 1:00PM-3:00PM EDT, 17:00-19:00 GMT
    ITRC's Vapor Intrusion Mitigation training is a series of eight (8) modules, presented over two sessions.

    The Vapor Intrusion Mitigation training series provides an overview of vapor intrusion mitigation and presenting information from the ITRC fact sheets, technology information sheets, and checklists (VIM-1, 2021):

    Session 1:
    • Introduction & Overview of Vapor Intrusion Mitigation Training Team
    • Conceptual Site Models for Vapor Intrusion Mitigation
    • Public Outreach During Vapor Intrusion Mitigation
    • Rapid Response & Ventilation for Vapor Intrusion Mitigation
    • Remediation & Institutional Controls

    Session 2:
    • Active Mitigation Approaches
    • Passive Mitigation Approaches
    • System Verification, OM&M, and Exit Strategies


    When certain contaminants or hazardous substances are released into the soil or groundwater, they may volatilize into soil gas. Vapor intrusion (VI) occurs when these vapors migrate up into overlying buildings and contaminate indoor air. ITRC has previously released guidance documents focused on VI, including the "Vapor Intrusion Pathway: A Practical Guidance" (VI-1, 2007) and "Petroleum Vapor Intrusion: Fundamentals of Screening, Investigation, and Management" (PVI, 2014). However, ITRC has received multiple requests for additional details and training on mitigation strategies for addressing this exposure pathway.

    The ITRC Vapor Intrusion Mitigation Team (VIMT) created ten fact sheets, 16 technology information sheets, and 4 checklists with the goal of assisting regulators during review of vapor intrusion mitigation systems, and helping contractors understand the essential elements of planning, design, implementation, and operation, maintenance and monitoring (OM&M) of mitigation systems.

    After the Vapor Intrusion Mitigation series, you should understand:
    • How to locate and utilize the VIM-1 fact sheets, technology information sheets, and checklists
    • The importance of a VI mitigation conceptual site model
    • How public outreach for VI mitigation differs from other environmental matters
    • When to implement rapid response for vapor intrusion and applicable methodologies
    • The differences between remediation, mitigation, and institutional controls
    • Available technologies for active and passive mitigation, and design considerations for various approaches
    • How/when/why different mitigation technologies are appropriate
    • How to verify mitigation system success, address underperformance, and develop a plan for discontinuing a mitigation system

    We encourage you to use the ITRC Vapor Intrusion Mitigation work products (VIM-1) and these training modules to learn about vapor intrusion mitigation and how you can apply these best practices to improve decision-making at your sites. For regulators and other government agency staff, this understanding of vapor intrusion mitigation can be incorporated into your own programs.

    While the training makes every effort to keep the information accessible to a wide audience, it is assumed that the participants will have some basic technical understanding of chemistry, environmental sciences, and risk assessment. As with other emerging contaminants, our understanding of vapor intrusion mitigation continues to advance. This training provides the participants with information on areas where the science is evolving and where uncertainty persists.

    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Environmental Data Management (EDM): Best Practices for Exchanging Environmental DataInterstate Technology and Regulatory Council
    April 16, 2024, 1:00PM-2:30PM EDT, 17:00-18:30 GMT
    The ITRC Environmental Data Management Best Practices Team (EDMBP Team) prepared a series of guidance documents and case studies on best practices for all phases of EDM to address the need for guidance on managing large stores of environmental data. Environmental data management (EDM) is a broad field that encompasses all aspects of environmental research and regulation, from habitat studies and wildlife management plans to health advisories and remediation of hazardous waste sites.

    The EDMBP Team developed three Roundtable training sessions to support the Guidance Document and case studies. You are welcome to register for any of the three, but they do not build upon each other.What good are data if you can't access it? At its root, data exchange is about making data accessible. It is the process of sharing data between systems. When it's done best, it is efficient, repeatable, and maintains the integrity of the data. At its worst, data are omitted, are mismatched, or there is no documentation on its origin. We think of data exchange in terms of incoming data and outgoing data. With incoming data, best practices span from inventorying sources to loading the data into a system. With outgoing data, best practices focus on documentation and automating exports into known schemas.

    During this Roundtable training, we will tackle some of the challenging issues in data exchange. If you're new to data exchange, it may open your eyes. If you've been exchanging data for years, we hope to provide some new tricks or considerations for you. Some of the topics we'll cover include:
    • What's the best way to handle using several analytical laboratories, each with a different electronic data deliverable (EDD)?
    • When systems use different valid values and schema, how can you design an efficient, repeatable exchange?
    • How do we know that the costly effort to extract, transform, and load the data from old PDFs into our system will provide value?
    • If someone asks for "all the data" but doesn't have a plan for import to an existing system, how do you provide it in an understandable way in a raw format?
    We want to answer your questions too. Are you wondering about how to handle analytes duplicated with multiple analytical methods? Or when you should automate or when to manually exchange? No question is too minor.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • ITRC PFAS Beyond the Basics: Sampling, Analysis, Surface Water, & Air OccurrenceInterstate Technology and Regulatory Council
    April 18, 2024, 1:00PM-3:00PM EDT, 17:00-19:00 GMT
    This ITRC training course will build upon PFAS sampling and analysis information presented in the PFAS 101 CLU-IN training. The ITRC PFAS Beyond the Basics class provides in-depth information on preparing for and implementing sampling events. Some detailed information and case studies are presented for sampling surface water and PFAS-containing foam that can form and aggregate at the surface water-air interface. The training includes information about PFAS analysis and discusses alternative qualitative analytical techniques. The occurrence of PFAS in air information from the literature for outdoor air, indoor air, settled dust and precipitation is discussed.

    Resources and further details for the topics included in this training are in the ITRC Guidance Document (PFAS-1) in Sections 6, 11, 15, 16 and 17.1 along with referenced tables.

    Learning Objectives:
    • Key elements that make sampling for PFAS different from other sampling events.
    • Best practices for preparing and conducting a PFAS sampling event.
    • Matrix-specific PFAS sampling guidance.
    • Surface water/foam sampling challenges and case study.
    • Options for compound-specific PFAS analysis and key differences of available methods.
    • Understanding PFAS analytical challenges (suspended solids, branched/linear isomers, bile salt interference).
    • Qualitative analytical techniques and when they can be useful.
    • Occurrence of PFAS in air.

    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Environmental Data Management (EDM): Real Life Application of Data Management Planning and Field Data Collection Best PracticesInterstate Technology and Regulatory Council
    April 25, 2024, 1:00PM-2:30PM EDT, 17:00-18:30 GMT
    The ITRC Environmental Data Management Best Practices Team (EDMBP Team) prepared a series of guidance documents and case studies on best practices for all phases of EDM to address the need for guidance on managing large stores of environmental data. Environmental data management (EDM) is a broad field that encompasses all aspects of environmental research and regulation, from habitat studies and wildlife management plans to health advisories and remediation of hazardous waste sites.

    The EDMBP Team developed three Roundtable training sessions to support the Guidance Document and case studies. You are welcome to register for any of the three, but they do not build upon each other.Now more than ever, there is a need to store, manage and interpret environmental data for effective decision making. Advances in technology have led to an expectation for near immediate results. Stakeholders want answers now to the pressing questions that well-managed data can help answer. The demand to be better, faster, and smarter will only continue to increase as expectations grow. However, many organizations find themselves struggling so much with basic data infrastructure that they have difficulty meeting basic reporting requirements. Even more concerning is how unprepared regulatory agencies can be when called upon to deal with data-intensive environmental incidents. Given all this, the importance of enacting best practices for environmental data management cannot be overstated.

    In this training, trainers will discuss concepts from the ITRC Environmental Data Management Best Practices documents focused on data management planning and field data collection. This discussion is intended for people of all skill or experience levels within the environmental industry or regulatory community.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

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    Archived Internet Seminars

  • SRP Water Innovation - An Integrated Approach to Sustainable Solutions: Session II - Technologies for Water Remediation - NIEHS Superfund Research Program, Archive of Jun 20, 2016 Seminar
    Link  http://www.cluin.org/live/archive/#20160620


  • Implementation of Triad for Petroleum Brownfield's Cleanup and Reuse - US EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division, Archive of Jan 26, 2010 Seminar
    Link  http://www.cluin.org/live/archive/#20100126


  • Triad Month Session 7: Dynamic Work Strategies - U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division, Archive of Aug 25, 2009 Seminar
    Link  http://www.cluin.org/live/archive/#20090825


  • Triad Month Session 6: Triad Case Studies - U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division, Archive of Aug 20, 2009 Seminar
    Link  http://www.cluin.org/live/archive/#20090820


  • Triad Month Session 5: Triad Implementation - U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division, Archive of Aug 18, 2009 Seminar
    Link  http://www.cluin.org/live/archive/#20090818


  • Triad Month Session 4: Triad Measurement Techniques - U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division, Archive of Aug 13, 2009 Seminar
    Link  http://www.cluin.org/live/archive/#20090813


  • Triad Month Session 3: Triad During RD/RA - U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division, Archive of Aug 11, 2009 Seminar
    Link  http://www.cluin.org/live/archive/#20090811


  • Triad Month Session 2: Triad Communications and Systematic Planning - U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division, Archive of Aug 6, 2009 Seminar
    Link  http://www.cluin.org/live/archive/#20090806


  • Triad Month Session 1: Introduction to Triad - U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division, Archive of Aug 4, 2009 Seminar
    Link  http://www.cluin.org/live/archive/#20090804


  • Triad: Beyond Characterization to Long-term Management of Groundwater Contaminant Plumes - U.S. EPA Technology Innovation Program, Archive of Sep 12, 2008 Seminar
    Link  http://www.cluin.org/live/archive/#20080912


  • Demystifying the DMA (Demonstration of Method Applicability) - U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division, Archive of Jul 28, 2008 Seminar
    Link  http://www.cluin.org/live/archive/#20080728


  • Management and Interpretation of Data Under a Triad Approach - U.S. EPA Technology Innovation and Field Services Division, Archive of May 22, 2008 Seminar
    Link  http://www.cluin.org/live/archive/#20080522


  • Triad Approach: A New Paradigm for Environmental Project Management - Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council, Archive of Feb 10, 2005 Seminar
    Link  http://www.cluin.org/live/archive/#20050210


  • The Triad Approach to Better Cleanup Projects: Illustrated with the Tree Fruit Case Study - U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. EPA, Technology Innovation Office, Archive of Jan 23, 2003 Seminar
    Link  http://www.cluin.org/live/archive/#20030123


  • Field-Based Geophysical Technologies Online Seminar - U.S. EPA, Technology Innovation Office, Archive of Dec 12, 2001 Seminar
    Link  http://www.cluin.org/live/archive/#20011212


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    Training Presentation Slides

    The links below lead to Triad training materials (PowerPoint presentations, video clips, etc.) developed by members of the Triad working group.

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    Workshops/Conferences

    Triad presentations and workshops are scheduled at a variety of venues over the next several months.

    • Triad Investigations: New Approaches and Innovative Strategies, Amherst, MA, June 10-12, 2008
      The national conference included training sessions, workshops, and platform sessions focused on implementation of new tools, approaches, and strategies for hazardous waste site characterization, site remediation, and site redevelopment. Equipment demonstrations augmented the exhibitions to bring practical applications to the technical theory and case studies presented during the conference. The conference featured cutting edge tools and techniques for sampling and monitoring related to real-time information, continuous monitoring, and long-term monitoring for site closure and stewardship. Best practices and lessons learned were emphasized throughout the training sessions, platform sessions, and workshops
      Link http://www.umass.edu/tei/conferences/presentations.html
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