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Multiagency support for Triad
Triad is a Federal/State Interagency Partnership


Training Classes and Materials

Information on Triad training classes and associated presentation materials are available via this section.

Classroom Training

  • CLU-IN Upcoming Courses and ConferencesUSEPA, This section of CLU-IN lists information on upcoming courses and conferences related to hazardous waste characterization and remediation. It allows you to search by event name, description, location, and date.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/courses/

  • Trainex: EPA's Classroom Training WebsiteUSEPA, This website lists training opportunities for federal, state, tribal, and local government staff involved in hazardous waste management and remediation. Included are schedules for deliveries of many courses, both classroom and Internet-based.
    Link  http://trainex.org

  • Best Management Practices for Site Assessment, Remediation, and Greener Cleanups - November 15, 2011, New York, New York USEPA, The Best Management Practices for Site Assessment, Site Remediation, and Green Remediation Footprint Reduction course is comprised of the following three Best Management Practices (BMP) sessions: BMPs for Site Assessments, BMPs for Site Remediation, and BMPs for Green Remediation Footprint Reduction.
    Link http://www.trainex.org/offeringslist.cfm?courseid=1228

  • Triad Training for Practitioners - November 16 - 18, 2011, New York, New YorkUSEPA, This course is based on best management practices (BMP) implemented by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), partnership organizations, federal and state partners, and consultants. Participants will learn how the Triad Approach can be used to streamline projects in a legal, technically sound, and cost-effective manner.
    Link http://www.trainex.org/offeringslist.cfm?courseid=796

Upcoming Internet Seminars

  • Mining Webinar Series: Successful Implementation of Biologically-Based Passive Remediation SystemsU.S. EPA, Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation, Technology Innovation and Field Services Division
    May 1, 2018, 2:00PM-3:30PM EDT, 18:00-19:30 GMT
    Metal mines at their end of active operations must prepare for the potential long-term treatment of mining-influenced water (MIW). This webinar will highlight how biologically-based passive remediation technologies have been shown to be a cost-effective option for treating MIW, especially mildly- to moderately-impacted waters at low- to moderate-flow rates such as may be found at remote or closed mine sites. Presenters will share an overview of biologically-based passive remediation technologies, their applicability to mining site conditions and illustrate the remedial design and evaluation process with a current treatability study example. In addition, two case study examples of mining sites with operating biologically-based passive treatment systems will be presented: Iron King Mine near Jerome, Arizona, and Garfield Mine near Delta, Colorado.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • New Approaches and Alternatives for Toxicity Testing: Session I - Toxicity Testing Strategies and Model SystemsNIEHS Superfund Research Program
    May 14, 2018, 1:00PM-3:00PM EDT, 17:00-19:00 GMT
    The series will highlight research that may be useful as new approaches and methodologies for testing for toxicity, coinciding with recent initiatives to found in EPA’s New Draft Strategic Plan to Reduce Animal Testing and NTP's Roadmap. The first session will provide an overview of toxicity testing strategies, and the pros/cons of using model systems (like zebrafish and cell-based assays) in hazard identification.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Combined Remedies: Adaptive, Flexible, Attentive Use of the Right ToolsOSRTI (Superfund Task Force #9)
    May 21, 2018, 1:00PM-2:00PM EDT, 17:00-18:00 GMT
    Combining remedies is becoming increasingly prevalent across the spectrum of hazardous waste sites from relatively simple to more complex. This trend is driven by 1) a larger remedial tool box; and 2) by increased understanding that contamination occurs in different phases and concentrations, and in different subsurface compartments.

    Combining remedies is only part of the story. Flexible, attentive, adaptive deployment is equally important as surprises are not uncommon and conditions change during remedy implementation. This webinar will discuss the underlying principles of attentive deployment of a variety of remedial technologies along with informative case studies - with particular emphasis on NPL sites.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • 2018 BUILD Act & the EPA Brownfields ProgramEPA Office of Brownfields and Land Revitalization
    June 6, 2018, 3:00PM-5:00PM EDT, 19:00-21:00 GMT
    The Brownfields Utilization, Investment, and Local Development Act (BUILD Act) was enacted as part of the FY18 Omnibus Appropriations Act. The BUILD Act amends the 2002 Brownfields Law and authorizes changes to EPA's Brownfields program.

    Members from EPA's Brownfields and Land Revitalization Program will provide an overview of how the BUILD Act changes some aspects of EPA’s brownfields grants, ownership and liability requirements, and State & Tribal Response Programs.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Remediation Management of Complex SitesInterstate Technology and Regulatory Council
    April 26, 2018, 1:00PM-3:15PM EDT, 17:00-19:15 GMT
    At some sites, complex site-specific conditions make it difficult to fully remediate environmental contamination. Both technical and nontechnical challenges can impede remediation and may prevent a site from achieving federal- and state-mandated regulatory cleanup goals within a reasonable time frame. For example, technical challenges may include geologic, hydrogeologic, geochemical, and contaminant-related conditions as well as large-scale or surface conditions. In addition, nontechnical challenges may also play a role such as managing changes that occur over long time frames, overlapping regulatory and financial responsibilities between agencies, setting achievable site objectives, maintaining effective institutional controls, redevelopment and changes in land use, and funding considerations.
    This training course and associated ITRC guidance: Remediation Management of Complex Sites (RMCS-1, 2017), provide a recommended holistic process for management of challenging sites, termed “adaptive site management.” This process is a comprehensive, flexible, and iterative process that is well-suited for sites where there is significant uncertainty in remedy performance predictions. Adaptive site management includes the establishment of interim objectives and long-term site objectives that consider both technical and nontechnical challenges. Periodic adjustment of the remedial approach may involve multiple technologies at any one time and changes in technologies over time. Comprehensive planning and scheduled evaluations of remedy performance help decision makers track remedy progress and improve the timeliness of remedy optimization, reevaluations, or transition to other technologies/contingency actions.
    By participating in this training course we expect you will learn to apply the ITRC guidance document to:
    • Identify and integrate technical and nontechnical challenges into a holistic approach to remediation
    • Use the Remediation Potential Assessment to identify whether adaptive site management is warranted due to site complexity
    • Understand and apply adaptive site management principles
    • Develop a long-term performance-based action plan
    • Apply well-demonstrated techniques for effective stakeholder engagement
    • Access additional resources, tools, and case studies most relevant for complex sites
    • Communicate the value of the guidance to regulators, practitioners, community members, and others
    Ultimately, using the guidance that can lead to better decision making and remediation management at complex sites. The guidance is intended to benefit a variety of site decision makers, including regulators, responsible parties and their consultants, and public and tribal stakeholders.
    Case studies are used to describe real-world applications of remediation and remediation management at complex sites. Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance Remediation Management of Complex Sites (RMCS-1, 2017) prior to attending the class.

    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soil: Considerations for Human Health Risk AssessmentInterstate Technology and Regulatory Council
    May 3, 2018, 1:00PM-3:15PM EDT, 17:00-19:15 GMT
    Risk-based cleanup goals are often calculated assuming that chemicals present in soil are absorbed by humans as efficiently as the chemicals dosed during the toxicity tests used to determine regulatory toxicity values (such as the Reference Dose or Cancer Slope Factor). This assumption can result in inaccurate exposure estimates and associated risks for some contaminated sites because the amount of a chemical absorbed (the chemical’s bioavailability) from contaminated soil can be a fraction of the total amount present. Properly accounting for soil-chemical interactions on the bioavailability of chemicals from soil can lead to more accurate estimates of exposures to soil contaminants and improve risk assessments by decreasing uncertainty.
    The basis for this training course is the ITRC guidance: Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soil: Considerations for Human Health Risk Assessment (BCS-1). This guidance describes the general concepts of the bioavailability of contaminants in soil, reviews the state of the science, and discusses how to incorporate bioavailability into the human health risk assessment process. This guidance addresses lead, arsenic, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) because evaluating bioavailability is better understood for these chemicals than for others, particularly for the incidental ingestion of soil.
    The target audience for this guidance and training course are:
    • Project managers interested in decreasing uncertainty in the risk assessment which may lead to reduced remedial action costs.
    • Risk assessors new to bioavailability or those who want additional confidence and training in the current methods and common practices for using bioavailability assessment to more accurately determine human health risk at a contaminated site.
    As a participant in this training you should learn to:
    • Value the ITRC document as a “go-to” resource for soil bioavailability
    • Apply the decision process to determine when a site-specific bioavailability assessment may be appropriate
    • Use the ITRC Review Checklist to develop or review a risk assessment that includes soil bioavailability
    • Consider factors that affect arsenic, lead and PAH bioavailability
    • Select appropriate methods to evaluate soil bioavailability
    • Use tools to develop site-specific soil bioavailability estimates and incorporate them into human health risk assessment
    Learners can envision themselves implementing the ITRC guidance through case study applications. Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soil: Considerations for Human Health Risk Assessment (BCS-1) prior to attending the class.

    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites a 3 Part Series - Part 1Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council
    May 8, 2018, 1:00PM-3:15PM EDT, 17:00-19:15 GMT
    Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites – 3-Part Series

    The newly updated LNAPLs (Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids) 3-part training course series is based on the ITRC guidance: LNAPL Site Management: LCSM Evolution, Decision Process, and Remedial Technologies (LNAPL-3, 2018) and focuses on connecting the science to managing LNAPL sites and helping you:
    • Build upon your Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface (Part 1)
    • Develop your LNAPL Conceptual Site Model and LNAPL Remedial Goals (Part 2)
    • Select/Implement LNAPL Technologies (Part 3)
  • After this training series, the expectation is that you will have the skills and understanding to use ITRC science-based resources to improve decision making at your LNAPL sites. For regulators and other government agency staff, this improved understanding can hopefully be incorporated into your own LNAPL programs.

    It is recommended that participants have a general understanding of hydrogeology and some familiarity with petroleum contaminated sites. The courses will build on your existing LNAPL knowledge and outline the framework for making LNAPL remediation and management decisions. It is expected that participants will attend this 3-part training series in sequence.

    LNAPL Training Part 1: Understanding LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface
    Part 1 teaches how LNAPLs behave in the subsurface and examines what controls their behavior. Part 1:
    • Explains what LNAPL data can tell you about the LNAPL and site conditions
    • Covers how that information is applied to the development of an LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) (Part 2) and LNAPL technology selection (Part 3)
    Relevant and practical examples are used to illustrate key concepts.

    LNAPL Training Part 2: LNAPL Conceptual Site Models and the LNAPL Decision Process
    Part 2 teaches participants how to develop an LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) and the overall framework for making LNAPL remediation and management decisions. Part 2:
    • Discusses key LNAPL and site data
    • Explains when and why those data may be important
    • Covers how to effectively organize the data into an LCSM
    Part 2 also discusses how to address LNAPL concerns by selecting appropriate goals and objectives, choosing applicable technologies, and assigning remedial performance metrics and endpoints.

    LNAPL Training Part 3: Using LNAPL Science, the LCSM, and LNAPL Goals to Select an LNAPL Remedial Technology
    Part 3 of the training teaches the importance of informed remedial technology selection and appropriate technology application. Part 3:
    • Discusses remedial technology groups
    • Introduces specific and new remedial technologies
    • Reviews the technology selection process, how technologies can be combined to accelerate cleanup, and how the LCSM informs selection
    A case study and examples demonstrate the use of these tools for remedial technology selection, implementation, and demonstration of successful remediation.
    Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, LNAPL Site Management: LCSM Evolution, Decision Process, and Remedial Technologies (LNAPL-3, 2018), prior to attending the class.

    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Characterization and Remediation of Fractured RockInterstate Technology and Regulatory Council
    May 17, 2018, 1:00PM-3:15PM EDT, 17:00-19:15 GMT
    Characterization and remediation of contaminated groundwater in fractured rock has not been conducted or studied as broadly as groundwater at unconsolidated porous media sites. This unfamiliarity and lack of experience can make fractured rock sites perplexing. This situation is especially true in portions of the U.S. where bedrock aquifers are a primary source of drinking and process water, and demands on water are increasing. As a result, remedial activities often default to containment of contaminant plumes, point of use treatment and long-term monitoring rather than active reduction of risk. However, this attitude does not incorporate recent advances in the science and technology of fractured rock site characterization and remediation.
    The basis for this training course is the ITRC guidance: Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock. The purpose of this guidance is to dispel the belief that fractured rock sites are too complex to characterize and remediate. The physical, chemical and contaminant transport concepts in fractured rock have similarities to unconsolidated porous media, yet there are important differences. These differences are the focus of this guidance.

    By participating in this training class, you should learn to:
    • Use ITRC’s Fractured Rock Document to guide your decision making so you can:
    • Develop quality Conceptual Site Models (CSMs) for fractured rock sites
    • Set realistic remedial objectives
    • Select the best remedial options
    • Monitor remedial progress and assess results
    • Value an interdisciplinary site team approach to bring collective expertise to improve decision making and to have confidence when going beyond containment and monitoring - - to actually remediating fractured rock sites.
    Case studies of successful fractured rock remediation are presented to provide examples of how fractured rock sites can be evaluated and available tools applied to characterization and remediation.
    Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock prior to attending the class.

    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites a 3 Part Series - Part 3Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council
    May 22, 2018, 1:00PM-3:15PM EDT, 17:00-19:15 GMT
    Connecting the Science to Managing LNAPL Sites – 3-Part Series

    The newly updated LNAPLs (Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids) 3-part training course series is based on the ITRC guidance: LNAPL Site Management: LCSM Evolution, Decision Process, and Remedial Technologies (LNAPL-3, 2018) and focuses on connecting the science to managing LNAPL sites and helping you:
    • Build upon your Understanding of LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface (Part 1)
    • Develop your LNAPL Conceptual Site Model and LNAPL Remedial Goals (Part 2)
    • Select/Implement LNAPL Technologies (Part 3)
  • After this training series, the expectation is that you will have the skills and understanding to use ITRC science-based resources to improve decision making at your LNAPL sites. For regulators and other government agency staff, this improved understanding can hopefully be incorporated into your own LNAPL programs.

    It is recommended that participants have a general understanding of hydrogeology and some familiarity with petroleum contaminated sites. The courses will build on your existing LNAPL knowledge and outline the framework for making LNAPL remediation and management decisions. It is expected that participants will attend this 3-part training series in sequence.

    LNAPL Training Part 1: Understanding LNAPL Behavior in the Subsurface
    Part 1 teaches how LNAPLs behave in the subsurface and examines what controls their behavior. Part 1:
    • Explains what LNAPL data can tell you about the LNAPL and site conditions
    • Covers how that information is applied to the development of an LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) (Part 2) and LNAPL technology selection (Part 3)
    Relevant and practical examples are used to illustrate key concepts.

    LNAPL Training Part 2: LNAPL Conceptual Site Models and the LNAPL Decision Process
    Part 2 teaches participants how to develop an LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM) and the overall framework for making LNAPL remediation and management decisions. Part 2:
    • Discusses key LNAPL and site data
    • Explains when and why those data may be important
    • Covers how to effectively organize the data into an LCSM
    Part 2 also discusses how to address LNAPL concerns by selecting appropriate goals and objectives, choosing applicable technologies, and assigning remedial performance metrics and endpoints.

    LNAPL Training Part 3: Using LNAPL Science, the LCSM, and LNAPL Goals to Select an LNAPL Remedial Technology
    Part 3 of the training teaches the importance of informed remedial technology selection and appropriate technology application. Part 3:
    • Discusses remedial technology groups
    • Introduces specific and new remedial technologies
    • Reviews the technology selection process, how technologies can be combined to accelerate cleanup, and how the LCSM informs selection
    A case study and examples demonstrate the use of these tools for remedial technology selection, implementation, and demonstration of successful remediation.
    Training participants are encouraged to view the associated ITRC guidance, LNAPL Site Management: LCSM Evolution, Decision Process, and Remedial Technologies (LNAPL-3, 2018), prior to attending the class.

    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

  • Geospatial Analysis for Optimization at Environmental SitesInterstate Technology and Regulatory Council
    June 19, 2018, 1:00PM-3:15PM EDT, 17:00-19:15 GMT
    Optimization activities can improve performance, increase monitoring efficiency, and support contaminated site decisions. Project managers can use geospatial analysis for evaluation of optimization opportunities. Unlike traditional statistical analysis, geospatial methods incorporate the spatial and temporal dependence between nearby data points, which is an important feature of almost all data collected as part of an environmental investigation. The results of geospatial analyses add additional lines of evidence to decision making in optimization opportunities in environmental sites across all project life cycle stages (release detection, site characterization, remediation, monitoring and closure) in soil, groundwater or sediment remediation projects for different sizes and types of sites.

    The purpose of ITRC's Geospatial Analysis for Optimization at Environmental Sites (GRO-1) guidance document and this associated training is to explain, educate, and train state regulators and other practitioners in understanding and using geospatial analyses to evaluate optimization opportunities at environmental sites. With the ITRC GRO-1 web-based guidance document and this associated training class, project managers will be able to:
    • Evaluate available data and site needs to determine if geospatial analyses are appropriate for a given site
    • For a project and specific lifecycle stage, identify optimization questions where geospatial methods can contribution to better decision making
    • For a project and optimization question(s), select appropriate geospatial method(s) and software using the geospatial analysis work flow, tables and flow charts in the guidance document
    • With geospatial analyses results (note: some geospatial analyses may be performed by the project manager, but many geospatial analyses will be performed by technical experts), explain what the results mean and appropriately apply in decision making
    • Use the project manager’s tool box, interactive flow charts for choosing geospatial methods and review checklist to use geospatial analyses confidently in decision making

    Link http://www.clu-in.org/live/

Archived Internet Seminars

  • Dynamic Data Collection Strategy Using Systematic Planning and Innovative Field-Based Measurement TechnologiesUSEPA & USACE, This seminar reviews the importance of systematic planning as a prelude to dynamic work strategies and innovative measurement technologies. Case studies illustrate site characterization, removal/remedial action and treatment system optimization.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/sysplan_031501/


  • The Triad Approach to Better Cleanup Projects: Illustrated with the Tree Fruit Case StudyUSEPA, This seminar introduces the importance of systematic project planning to ensure the quality of project decisions. Dynamic work strategies and field measurement technologies simultaneously bring down project costs while increasing decision confidence.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/triad_012303/


  • Field Analytical Technologies for VOCs in GroundwaterUSEPA, This seminar describes an evaluation the ETV Program did for five different technologies for generating field analytical measurements of VOCs in groundwater. Basic principles of operation underlying the various technologies is presented, along with a summary of the performance of each of the technologies with their advantages and limitations.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/vocgw_022701/


  • Field-Based Analytical Methods for Explosive CompoundUSEPA, This seminar covers field-based methods for explosives residues in soil and water, including the analytical challenges posed by compounds with a short review of fixed-lab methods. Sampling considerations for water and soil matrices are also covered, with particular emphasis on the extreme spatial heterogeneity generally found in soils.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/explosives_082801/


  • Field-Based Geophysical TechnologiesUSEPA, This 2-hr seminar starts with the basic science behind geophysical technologies and how they fit into smarter approaches to cleaning up hazardous waste sites. Throughout the seminar, instructors describe how the use of systematic planning, dynamic work strategies, and field technologies are applied to developing a CSM that can reliably guide site cleanup activities.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/geophysical_121201/


  • Uses of Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA)USEPA, Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) is free software that incorporates tools from environmental assessment fields into an effective problem solving environment. These tools include integrated modules for visualization, geospatial analysis, statistical analysis, human health risk assessment, ecological risk assessment, cost/benefit analysis, sampling design, and decision analysis. This seminar highlights the tools uses, but is not a tutorial for the software.
    Link http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/sada_081506/

Training Presentation Slides

The links below lead to Triad training materials (PowerPoint presentations, video clips, etc.) developed by members of the Triad working group.





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